Cervical Fusion versus Disc Replacement Surgery

Chronic neck and back pain can lead to serious health problems if they remain untreated.
When patients come to us with neck and back pain, we often discover through MRI that they suffer from
a herniated disc.

After screening the patients, we typically start with non-operative methods to relieve the suffering and
improve their posture. Such treatments include but are not limited to: physical therapy, rest,
medication, braces, and spinal injections.

When such non-operative methods are not enough to improve the health of our patients, fortunately
we can operate on the spine to improve their condition.
Two main surgical procedures are available to us.
Cervical fusion as a surgery has been used for decades. It is tested and true. It can improve patients’
quality of lives in little time.
More recently, we started offering a disc replacement surgery. Which is the latest cutting-edge
technology in treating herniated discs.
Some of the advantages of a disc replacement are there is less chance of future damage to the spine near
the herniated disc that has been repaired/replaced.
In this video, Dr. Joseph Shehadi Neurosurgeon at Neurosurgery Associates in Columbus Ohio took the
initiative of educating us on the different techniques used in treating the spine. Both nonoperative and
operative measures, as well as their particularities. All in about a minute.

 

He sheds light on the main differences between cervical fusion and a disc replacement surgery.
He will be providing more educative videos that address the fascinating world of neurosurgery.

 

You can ask Dr. Shehadi questions by contacting him at his office or by using the contact page.

 

What is intermittent fasting

Neurosurgery Associates intermittent fasting

Weight control is something that most people struggle with at one point or another.

If you follow trending diets, you have probably heard about a plethora of them. Namely:

Low-carbohydrate diets such as Atkins, Duncan and South Beach.

Low-fat diets such as McDowell’s starch diet.

Crash diets such as the Beverly Hills Diet.
Detox Diets such as juice fasting.

And the low calories diets such as Nutrisystem and Weight Watchers.

The intermittent fasting diet belongs to the low calories type but the focus is more on WHEN to eat over WHAT to eat.

Neurosurgery Associates blog pictures

There are several diets that fall within the intermittent fasting branch.

However, we will focus on the 5:2 method in this article.

The method gained popularity in 2012 following to the BBC article named ‘The Power of intermittent fasting’.

And you can also watch the documentary ‘Eat, Fast and live longer’.

intermittent fasting

So what exactly is the 5:2 fasting program?

As the name suggests, for 5 days in a given week, you can have your normal calories intake and then fast for two NON-CONSECUTIVE DAYS. And during those fasting days, you can still eat one meal that consists of a maximum of 600 calories.
Track your weight and avoid endurance sports during diet days.

What is particularly interesting about intermittent fasting, is that it decreases fat while maintaining muscle mass.

A study that was published in the Journal of Translational Medicine in 2016 showed promising results

‘After 8 weeks, the 2 Way ANOVA (Time * Diet interaction) showed a decrease in fat mass in TRF compared to ND (p = 0.0448), while fat-free mass, muscle area of the arm and thigh, and maximal strength were maintained in both groups. Testosterone and insulin-like growth factor 1 decreased significantly in TRF, with no changes in ND (p = 0.0476; p = 0.0397). Adiponectin increased (p = 0.0000) in TRF while total leptin decreased (p = 0.0001), although not when adjusted for fat mass. Triiodothyronine decreased in TRF, but no significant changes were detected in thyroid-stimulating hormone, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, or triglycerides. Resting energy expenditure was unchanged, but a significant decrease in respiratory ratio was observed in the TRF group.’

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Back pain during Pregnancy. Possible causes and treatments

A pregnant woman is more at risk to develop back pain

Naturally, as a woman gets pregnant her body starts gaining weight and experience changes that may result in back pain.

We will list five common causes for such pains and what can be done to improve the quality of life during those 9 precious months where women have to cope with so many life changes happening at the same time.

1- Extra weight accumulated during pregnancy is added to the spine. This extra weight causes extra strain on the spine.

2- Posture adaptation. As a result of the rapid local accumulation of weight, a posture deformation occurs to compensate for the new center of gravity of the body. Such shift causes back pain.

3- Release of the hormone Relaxin. This hormone once released loosens the spine which can be a cause of pain.

4 Stress affects everything believe it or not, including your spine.

5- Physical Changes in the uterus cause muscle interactions that cause pain.

The pain usually gets better before giving birth.

If you are looking for ways to ease the pain during these precious months, here are a few tips that can help:

1- Swim or just exercise as much as possible. It will help greatly.

2- Exercise to improve your posture. We recommend the McKenzie method among others

3- Get plenty of rest and avoid sleeping on your back

4- Shoes are important. High heels will not help

5- Compresses applied locally can help ease your pain. Use both hot and cold.

6- Meditate to release your stress and if meditation is not enough you can see a therapist. They are qualified to help you.

7- Chiro or physiotherapists may help improve your posture.

8- If the pain is serious and persistent, call your doctor.

Call our office for more information, our staff is always available to help you.

herniated disk

Symptoms of a Herniated Disk

Herniated discs can cause a variety of different symptoms, but those symptoms can vary depending on where the disc herniation occurs in your spine. Below, we take a closer look at the symptoms of herniated discs based on where they develop in your back. Read more

Are You Doing These 3 Things To Your Neck?

It’s alarming but true that some common, everyday actions can be bad for your neck—especially if they’re done frequently. Working to break these common habits can do a world of good for your neck health, preventing pain and stiffness. Read more

leg pain and numbness

What Leg Pain and Numbness Might Mean

Source: Spine Health / By: Grant Cooper, MD

Leg pain and numbness can be experienced in many forms—some patients describe the pain as aching, searing, throbbing, or burning, or like standing in a bucket of ice water. Read more

neck stiffness

Could Your Neck Stiffness Mean Meningitis?

Source: Spine-Health / By Stefano M. Sinicropi, MD, FAAOS

Meningitis is a serious condition that occurs when the meninges—protective membranes covering the brain and spinal cord—become infected and inflamed. Early symptoms can be similar to the flu. However, having a stiff neck in addition to flu-like symptoms could be a key clue that meningitis is the problem and should be checked by a doctor. Read more

text neck

Text Neck – A Modern ‘Epidemic’

What is next neck?

Text neck is a modern spine condition caused by looking down at a wireless device such as a smartphone, tablet, or other handheld device for too long. This ailment is an increasingly common issue, and if not taken care of, could lead to lifelong neck pain. Read more

Sacroiliac joint fusion

Sacroiliac (SI) Joint Fusion

What is the sacroiliac joint?

The sacroiliac (SI) joint connects the sacrum to the ilium bone of the pelvis (see diagram below). This joint is responsible for bearing upper-body weight and transmitting it to the pelvis and legs. Read more

pituitary tumors

Pituitary Tumors – Symptoms and Treatment

What are pituitary tumors?

Pituitary tumors are noncancerous tumors that develop in the pituitary gland, a pea-sized gland located just below the brain behind the nasal cavity. This gland is often referred to as the “master gland” because it controls the function of many other endocrine glands. The pituitary gland secretes hormones responsible for growth, metabolism regulation, fluid balance, testosterone/estrogen regulation, sperm/egg production, and milk production after birth. Tumors can grow inside of the gland and are rather common. Read more